News

Neonicotinoid exposure disrupts bumblebee nest behavior, social networks, and thermoregulation

Crall JD, Switzer CM, Oppenheimer RL, Ford Versypt AN, Dey B, Brown A, Eyster M, Guérin C, Pierce NE, Combes SA, de Bivort BL

Molecular, spatial and functional single-cell profiling of the hypothalamic preoptic region

Moffitt JR, Bambah-Mukku D, Eichhorn SW, Vaughn E, Shekhar K, Perez JD, Rubinstein ND, Hao J, Regev A, Dulac C, Zhuang X

Congratulations to Xiaowei Zhuang: 2019 Breakthrough Prize winner!

She won “For discovering hidden structures in cells by developing super-resolution imaging – a method that transcends the fundamental spatial resolution limit of light microscopy."

A method for single-neuron chronic recording from the retina in awake mice.

Hong G, Fu TM, Qiao M, Viveros RD, Yang X, Zhou T, Lee JM, Park HG, Sanes JR, Lieber CM

Upcoming Events

Neurolunch

Assessing the role of hippocampal replay in retrospective revaluation

Hector Penagos-Vargas (Gershman Lab & Wilson Lab (MIT))
Wed 12 Dec noon - Northwest Building, Room 243
Postdoctoral Fellow
Neurolunch

Neurolunch

Yirong Peng (Sanes Lab)
Wed 23 Jan noon - Northwest Building, Room 243
Postdoctoral Fellow
CBS Seminar

CBS Seminar

Elizabeth Buffalo (University of Washington)
Tue 5 Feb noon - Location - TBA
Associate Professor
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Neurolunch

Katrin Vogt (Samuel Lab)
Wed 6 Feb noon - Northwest Building, Room 243
Postdoctoral Fellow
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Neurolunch

Greg Guitchounts (Cox Lab)
Wed 13 Feb noon - Northwest Building, Room 243
Graduate Student
CBS Seminar

CBS Seminar

Gene Robinson (University of Illinois, Champagne-Urbana)
Tue 19 Feb noon - Location - TBA
Professor
Neurolunch

Neurolunch

Xin Jin (Arlotta Lab)
Wed 20 Feb noon - Northwest Building, Room 243
Junior Fellow at Harvard Society of Fellows
CBS Seminar

CBS Seminar

Gloria Choi (MIT)
Tue 26 Feb noon - Location - TBA
Professor
CBS Seminar

CBS Seminar

Andreas Nieder (University of Tübingen)
Tue 5 Mar noon - Location - TBA
Professor

What We Do

Researchers in the Center for Brain Science (CBS) are discovering how brain circuits give rise to computations that underlie thought and behavior. We are determining the structure and function of neural circuits; investigating how these circuits govern behavior and vary between individuals; learning how they change during development and aging; and deepening our understanding of what is amiss in neurological and psychiatric disorders, and how to address these pathologies. To accomplish this mission, CBS brings neuroscientists together with physical scientists and engineers to develop and deploy new tools for neuroscience. Headquartered in the new Northwest Building on Oxford Street in Cambridge, CBS has strong links throughout the neuroscience community at Harvard University. Members are drawn from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Harvard Medical School, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and the Harvard-affiliated hospitals.

Neuroengineering: what tools we need

Neuroimaging: what underlies our thoughts

Light Microscopy: what the brain looks like 

Electron Microscopy: what is the brain's nanostructure

Connectome Project: how the brain is wired

Swartz Program: how do we understand brain function

Education: what training we need